Why read The organized mind?

I kept coming across mentions of The Organized Mind so took my prompt and had a read.  

Written by a neuroscientist it merits the time spent.

Early chapters deal with questions of how we currently believe our mind manages to retain and locate information.  Throughout it has handy suggestions of what the implications of this might be for how we should work, organise our possessions and support our brains natural tendencies. 

There is accordingly much to interest fans of to do lists, filing systems and categorisation generally.

Those with an interest in critical appraisal would do well to read chapter 6 “organizing information for the hardest decisions”. This offers some very clear explanations of assessing the implications of different medical decisions. It does this with two by two tables (there is a further appendix on this) and I think inspiration could be drawn from this for execises and building understanding. 

There is then a primer on information literacy though I suspect experts might find a bit to argue with (the section on wikipedia for example in the light of research on how that community of editors is maturing).

A worthwhile read!

April 2016 Cilip Update (plus October 2015)

Items of note in the new issue and the back issue…

April starts with the usual news.  A small item in the news section about Sci hub is hopefully a signal for some deeper analysis of this.  Given the universal preference for no logins and simplicity in access this is one of the big stories in scholarly publishing.  The creator of the site has a very different definition of Open Access to the one librarians would recognise but it feels like this could lead to a more rapid transition to a more legally realistic Open model.

The opposite page links nicely with Sandra Ward discussing the need for skills around risk, security and data privacy.  Good luck to the people who have given Sci hub their network logins and think they will only be used to access journal articles.

The article on the value of trained library and information professionals is encouraging. The full report will warrant reading.

I enjoyed reading about work to bring student art into the library space in Wimbledon. Not sure how we could support something of this kind with our students. Adding visual and physical learning aids would be a start.

Now back to October 2015 with a health focus apparent…

News wise this feels like an issue where CILIP HQ is starting to show the response to member pressure for a more actively advocating institute. The initial response to the AGM resolution to oppose amateurisation was underwhelming but it feels like My Library By Right and other work is now moving things in a better direction.

An item on faculty / librarian collaboration looks very relevant to my interests – I had missed this one at the time and it sounds like a potential team journal club conversation starter.

The cover article on Knowledge for Healthcare is a good run through. The one year updates are now circulating and a lot has been achieved. My own involvement in the Metrics work has been stretching both in terms of building knowledge on the topic but also in leading a distributed team. I wish I had pushed for a face to face meeting sooner as this really improved our subsequent work together.

More health with an informative article from RCSEng on their collection review. I am lucky to sit as an external on their joint Museums, Archives, Library and Surgical Information Services committee and this article really filled out the story on work I had heard about there. The close working relationship presented here is a great example of how heritage collections can underpin modern practice. I highly recommend the recently opened temporary display at the Hunterian on vaccination which includes letters from Edward Jenner, film, moulages from the Gordon Museum and historic antivaxxer postcards.

It was useful to think about what happens to our social media accounts on our death. It some ways a companion piece to the talk by Brian Kelly at Internet Librarian 2013 ago on what happens to your digitally speaking when you leave an employer. I definitely have some work to do to be ready for either of these eventualities.